Delivered straight to your inbox every Monday

Photo & Business Coaching

Free!

GET your FIRST LESSON NOW ≥

Back to

Browse by Category

Browse by Category:

BLOG HOME

Back to

Browse by Category:

BLOG Home

Browse by Category

We help people take great photos and build profitable businesses that change lives. We’re high school sweethearts, former elementary school teachers and professional photographers. We're experts at making the complex feel simple and believe education is serious business, but learning should be fun.

searcH

free shooting class

3 Proven Tricks to Shoot Better & Edit Faster

connect with us

SOCIAL MEDIA

GET your first lesson now ≥
PHOTO AND BUSINESS COACHING

Delivered straight to your inbox every Monday

shoot & edit like us

Our Most Popular Course for Photographers

LEARN MORE ≥
GET your first lesson now ≥
GET your first lesson now ≥

The Amy & Jordan Store

Courses & Tools for Photographers   

Free!

Pink Slip
Files

The

Just wait until you read number 10...

hey, we're amy & jordan!

The Lens We Love for Getting Ready Photos

We’re in the middle of a series on the lenses we love. We’re explaining all of the lenses we own, why we decided to purchase them, and how we use them on wedding days (and on portrait sessions). You can catch up on this series here:

Today, we’ll be talking about the third lens we purchased, the Canon 24-70 2.8L, and the two reasons why we still start and end every wedding day with this lens. (Since we purchased this lens a few years ago, Canon has released an updated version. You can find it here.)

When we arrive at the bride’s getting ready location, it’s important to make her feel comfortable from the start. Instead of walking in with our cameras firing and lenses blazing, we prefer to smile, give her a big hug, introduce ourselves to her bridesmaids, and let her know how excited we are to be there. Even the happiest brides get a little bit nervous when the shutter starts clicking, so it’s important to reassure her right away, set the right tone from the beginning, and give her a clear, calming expectation of what’s to come. We usually start by asking her for the details (dress, shoes, rings, bouquet), and then follow up with this question: Are there any other important details you’d like us to photograph? After we offer a few possibilities (handwritten notes, family heirlooms, perfume), our brides usually grab a few more items, and we leave the room and take the details somewhere else to photograph before she puts them on. When we return for final makeup and hair retouches, and getting on the dress, we pull out this lens for…

1. Getting Ready Room


Every bride’s getting ready room is different, but the one thing they all have in common is that they’re a tight squeeze and moments happen fast. When we’re squished into a small corner and the bride’s mom is lacing up her dress, we need to grab wide shots of the entire room and close-ups of the bride and her mom, too. As much as we love prime lenses, in a getting ready room, we oftentimes don’t have any ability to move, and we don’t have time to change lenses, and that’s why we love our first telephoto lens. It zooms between 24mm and 70mm. So, from close distances, it can get really wide (24mm), and from farther distances, it can get really close (70mm). And it does both really fast. Without moving and within seconds, we’re able to take wide shots of an entire room, grab a portrait of the bride getting her dress on, and zoom to her mom’s hands lacing up the corset. No other lens provides this kind of flexibility and quickness in the getting ready room, and that’s why we love it. Interestingly, getting ready rooms and dance floors have a lot in common, which is why we loves this lens for…

Erica and Kevin-1 Mai and PJ_0007

2. The Reception


A lot happens at wedding receptions, and there’s not always a lot of space to move without being in the way, or a lot of time to react and change lenses without missing a moment, so we don’t. During the first dance, we’re able to get tight shots of the bride and groom’s reactions, as well as wide shots of the entire ballroom. We’re able to capture their moment without missing a moment or interfering with one. During toasts, we’re able to get tight enough to photograph the father of the bride smile, and get wide enough to shoot the head table’s reaction to something funny or heart-warming that he said. During open dancing, the most important people in the room are the bride and groom – and we can’t control where they are on the dance floor. Most of the time, we position ourselves on the outskirts of the dance floor. If the bride and groom are on the outskirts of the dance floor and we’re only a few feet away, we need a lens wide enough (24mm) to get most of their bodies. If they’re in the middle of a crowded dance floor, we need a lens tight enough (70mm) to zoom in and work around the dancing without getting in the middle of it. That’s why we love this lens for receptions.

Mai and PJ_0034

Early on in our business, this third lens allowed us to shoot complete wedding days from the getting ready room to the dance floor, from beginning to end. Looking back, it was the perfect third lens for us. If you’ve been looking for a great way to photograph weddings from start to finish, it just might be the perfect lens for you, too. Have a great day, and let’s make each other better.

Mai and PJ_0038

Alisa

Hey, We're Amy & Jordan!

We help people take better photos and build successful photography businesses. Get our free photography and business coaching delivered straight to your inbox every week.

free coaching, please  ≥

You Might Also Like

  1. Tessa June Ardolf

    March 25th, 2014 at 7:53 am

    Does this lens have a stabilizer? I already have a 50mm 1.8, would it be wise for me to purchase the 24-70mm 2.8L or the 85mm 1.8 for my next purchase? I am using a canon 7d… I am a portrait photographer who is now recently beginning to book weddings. I am very new to the photography business 🙂 Thanks!

  2. Tessa June Ardolf

    March 25th, 2014 at 7:53 am

    Does this lens have a stabilizer? I already have a 50mm 1.8, would it be wise for me to purchase the 24-70mm 2.8L or the 85mm 1.8 for my next purchase? I am using a canon 7d… I am a portrait photographer who is now recently beginning to book weddings. I am very new to the photography business 🙂 Thanks!

  3. Amy & Jordan

    March 25th, 2014 at 2:48 pm

    Hi Tessa! The Canon 7D has a crop sensor, which means the focal lengths for all of your lenses need to be multiplied by 1.6 to get their effective value when used on that camera body. For example, the 50mm will act like an 80mm on your camera, not a 50mm. So, in your case, I’d definitely spring for the 24-70mm, because it’ll give you the ability to shoot the getting ready room and reception at every wedding with ease. The ability to get in and out quickly in both situations, in our opinion, is key. It was the third lens we purchased after the 50mm 1.4 and the 100mm Macro, and we STILL use it at every wedding and couldn’t shoot a wedding without it. If you connect to B&H through a link on our page when you decide to purchase, we get a small commission and it costs you the same! We’d definitely appreciate it if you’ve found our blog helpful 🙂

  4. Tessa June Ardolf

    March 26th, 2014 at 9:14 am

    Thanks for the advice! One last thing, I heard a lot of people really like the 135mm 2L. Would you think this would be a smart move? They say it is a lot lighter than the 24-70mm… Also, do you still use the 24-70mm today? Or did you upgrade to the 24-70mm II? I guess I am just partially confused because I have heard a lot of great things about many lenses (including the 85mm 1.8 – which I found a great deal on), and I am unsure which one would benefit me more for my next purchase…

  5. Amy & Jordan

    March 26th, 2014 at 1:22 pm

    For us, at the beginning, when we got serious about weddings, the most important lens question was this: What range do we need to shoot a complete wedding? We decided that we need a range of 24mm – 200mm to be effective, with the 24-70mm being more important at first. At 24mm, we’re able to get into tight getting ready rooms and get the whole scene, yet we’re still able to zoom tight enough to get close up shots without having to change lenses. Same on the dance floor. We’re able to get super wide to show everything that’s happening, yet we’re still able to zoom for toasts without being right in someone’s face. The 70-200mm is PERFECT for ceremonies, because you can be FAR away and still get great shots. It’s also a beautiful portrait lens, too. We have friends we swear by their 135mm, but we’d never do anything other than a zoom lens for ceremonies, like the 70-200mm. Our dream lens is the 85mm, but we can’t justify it yet, because our 50mm and 70-200mm both do a fine job for portraits. The key, we think, at first, is getting enough range to shoot a full wedding day. If you spring for the 85mm or the 135mm, you’re stuck with a prime lens that doesn’t get you wide enough to cover crucial moments that you’ll need to cover. If we were in your shoes, we’d get the 24-70mm and then the 70-200mm hands down every time. Then, once you’ve got your range, you can get better lenses within that range for specific purposes, like the 85mm for just portraits, for example. Hope that helps!

    Also, we still use the old version of the 24-70mm, but we’ve borrowed our friend;s new version and it’s AWESOME!

  6. Amy & Jordan

    March 25th, 2014 at 2:48 pm

    Hi Tessa! The Canon 7D has a crop sensor, which means the focal lengths for all of your lenses need to be multiplied by 1.6 to get their effective value when used on that camera body. For example, the 50mm will act like an 80mm on your camera, not a 50mm. So, in your case, I’d definitely spring for the 24-70mm, because it’ll give you the ability to shoot the getting ready room and reception at every wedding with ease. The ability to get in and out quickly in both situations, in our opinion, is key. It was the third lens we purchased after the 50mm 1.4 and the 100mm Macro, and we STILL use it at every wedding and couldn’t shoot a wedding without it. If you connect to B&H through a link on our page when you decide to purchase, we get a small commission and it costs you the same! We’d definitely appreciate it if you’ve found our blog helpful 🙂

  7. Tessa June Ardolf

    March 26th, 2014 at 9:14 am

    Thanks for the advice! One last thing, I heard a lot of people really like the 135mm 2L. Would you think this would be a smart move? They say it is a lot lighter than the 24-70mm… Also, do you still use the 24-70mm today? Or did you upgrade to the 24-70mm II? I guess I am just partially confused because I have heard a lot of great things about many lenses (including the 85mm 1.8 – which I found a great deal on), and I am unsure which one would benefit me more for my next purchase…

  8. Amy & Jordan

    March 26th, 2014 at 1:22 pm

    For us, at the beginning, when we got serious about weddings, the most important lens question was this: What range do we need to shoot a complete wedding? We decided that we need a range of 24mm – 200mm to be effective, with the 24-70mm being more important at first. At 24mm, we’re able to get into tight getting ready rooms and get the whole scene, yet we’re still able to zoom tight enough to get close up shots without having to change lenses. Same on the dance floor. We’re able to get super wide to show everything that’s happening, yet we’re still able to zoom for toasts without being right in someone’s face. The 70-200mm is PERFECT for ceremonies, because you can be FAR away and still get great shots. It’s also a beautiful portrait lens, too. We have friends we swear by their 135mm, but we’d never do anything other than a zoom lens for ceremonies, like the 70-200mm. Our dream lens is the 85mm, but we can’t justify it yet, because our 50mm and 70-200mm both do a fine job for portraits. The key, we think, at first, is getting enough range to shoot a full wedding day. If you spring for the 85mm or the 135mm, you’re stuck with a prime lens that doesn’t get you wide enough to cover crucial moments that you’ll need to cover. If we were in your shoes, we’d get the 24-70mm and then the 70-200mm hands down every time. Then, once you’ve got your range, you can get better lenses within that range for specific purposes, like the 85mm for just portraits, for example. Hope that helps!

    Also, we still use the old version of the 24-70mm, but we’ve borrowed our friend;s new version and it’s AWESOME!

  9. Lindsey Brown

    June 29th, 2014 at 10:08 am

    Loved this series! Was wondering if you guys have blogged about using off camera flash as seen in the dancing picture of this post? Trying to learn more about it and and would love your input!

  10. Kayla

    July 30th, 2017 at 5:29 am

    Hi Amy & Jordan

    Just recently found your blog and am reading through everything! Thank you for posting such informative advice.

    I’m a beginner but aim to learn quickly so that I can make this hobby a career 🙂

    I’m using a Nikon 610, can you advise on what lens would give me the same results you’ve mentioned in this blog post please.

    Thanks so much!
    Kayla (all the way from the UK)

  11. Amy & Jordan

    August 1st, 2017 at 1:24 pm

    Hi Kayla from the UK! We’re so glad to have you as part of our online photography community! Welcome! If your camera has a full-frame sensor, which it looks like yours is, we typically recommend the nicest 50mm you can afford as your first prime lens 🙂 Hope that helps! Can’t wait to connect with you more!

  12. Christy

    December 3rd, 2017 at 8:09 am

    Hi Amy and Jordan! Question for you about this zoom lens. I only have primes right now, but this lens is my potential next investment. After initially setting up your white balance and exposure with the ExpoDisc, how do you go about adjusting your settings when zooming in and out? I’m sooooo intimidated by this.

  13. Amy & Jordan

    December 8th, 2017 at 3:29 pm

    Hi Christy! Great question! Here’s the good news: You use the ExpoDisc to set your exposure and white balance for the place where you’re GOING to shoot, so once you go back to your shooting spot, as long as the subject stays in the same light, it doesn’t matter whether you’re five feet away or fifty feet! Are you in our online Shooting & Editing Course by any chance? We have an entire module dedicated to showing you EXACTLY how to use the ExpoDisc to get a correct white balance and exposure every single time. Here’s a link for that in case you’re interested! Hope that helps!

    http://store.demoseducation.com/shooting-editing-course

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We help people take better photos and build successful photography businesses. We’re high school sweethearts, former elementary school teachers and professional photographers. We're experts at making the complex feel simple and believe education is serious business, but learning should be fun.

searcH

free shooting class

3 Proven Tricks to Shoot Better & Edit Faster

connect with us

SOCIAL MEDIA

The Amy & Jordan Store

Courses & Tools for Photographers   

hey, we're amy & jordan!

Title

"I always look forward to your emails! I get excited every time I get an email notification that says 'Amy & Jordan!' Even though we've never formally met, you guys have pretty much become the photography mentor I've never had!" 

- priscilla T. 

"I LOVEEE the Monday Minute and I look forward to it every week!"

- brianna c.

"The Monday Minute has seriously changed the way I look at my business! In the last year, my business has completely changed and evolved and I know that it's greatly due to my time 'spent' with the two of you!" 

- nicole B.

"Best year of my life! (Photography-wise!)" 

- naomi D. 

EMAIL ≥
FIRST NAME ≥

Delivered straight to your inbox every Monday!

Photo & Business Coaching

Free!

By clicking the button below, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.